Monthly Archives: July 2013

Grisbot screen interface for light track

You know, time just flies when I’m doing graphic design. I sure wish I was good at it. Anyhow, the above screen shows the graphical interface (in Scratch) for programming the robot in ‘light track’ mode. 0a: Specifies the distance … Continue reading

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Grisbot (S3) follows the light

Poor Little Grisbot S3, I misprogrammed it this morning and instead of going forward it went backward — and off the table onto the floor. Despite landing upside down, it worked all right once I unbent the photocell leads. Anyhow, … Continue reading

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Grisbot Model S3

This is basically a wood and glue robot, but it’s sturdy enough for running around a tabletop and that’s what counts. As you can see, it’s also quite small — not much bigger than an Arduino or a computer mouse. … Continue reading

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Introducing Foambot

In my continuing quest to drive down the cost of grisbot, I’ve had to reconsider using acrylic. The material costs $3, and then on a good day the local hackerspace charges $18 to cut it. And then depending on the … Continue reading

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Test vs. Reality

On the right hand side of the photo is the ‘test bed’ that I use for robot programming. It consists of an Arduino and a couple of breadboards. The support platform is ‘Getting Started with Processing’ but any book of … Continue reading

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Five Things To Remember (Pun!) About Arduino EEPROM

EEPROM stands for Electronic Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory and is the place in chip memory where data can be stored in the Arduino/ATMega328 even after power down. This can be useful! The Arduino site has specifics on the EEPROM … Continue reading

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Grisbot Scratch Interface for Free-Form Mode

The idea behind free-form mode is that a user can design her own path, say on a sheet of paper, and then program the robot accordingly. Consequently, the programming page simply shows the waypoint icons lined up in rows and … Continue reading

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